Bread for the World: Oregon
Oregon BFW is part of a nationwide Christian citizens movement seeking justice for the world's hungry people by lobbying our nation's decision makers. 

An effective response to hunger must combine private and public actions, neither can do the job alone. Christians have worked well in the private arena, Bread for the World provides a means where Christians can work equally well for effective public policies in the fight against hunger...

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Bread for the World: Legislative Update


Our Faithful Opposition to Slashing Life-saving Programs 

2017 is shaping up to be one of the most challenging ever for our work to end hunger and poverty by 2030. Read more. 

2017 Offering of Letters Officially Launches 

Bread for the World's 2017 Offering of Letters: Doing Our Part to End Hunger has officially launched. Materials are now available in both English and Spanish on our website. Read more.

ACT: Write to Congress Now.

 

Trump Budget Targets Poor and Hungry People

Bread for the World is alarmed by the release of the Trump administration’s “skinny” budget for fiscal year 2018, which targets international and domestic programs that serve poor and hungry people. If passed, this budget would make it nearly impossible to end hunger and extreme poverty.  
“The unprecedented spending cuts President Trump is proposing to the State Department and other international programs would roll back the tremendous progress we have made against hunger and poverty,” said Rev. David Beckmann, president of Bread for the World. “This budget could not be more shortsighted. Less than 1 percent of the U.S. budget goes to foreign aid. Trump is proposing these cuts as 20 million people stand on the verge of or are in the midst of famine in Africa.”

President Trump’s budget proposes a 31 percent cut to the State Department and USAID, which fund many of the United States’ foreign aid and development assistance programs. It would also eliminate the McGovern–Dole International Food for Education and Child Nutrition Program, which supports nutrition and education in poor countries, and the Africa Development Fund. In 2015, 2.9 million children benefited from the McGovern-Dole program.

“It is clear from this budget that the administration plans to restructure the State Department and USAID, moving away from those who need assistance the most,” Beckmann added.

The proposed budget also includes significant cuts to programs that serve poor and hungry Americans. This includes the 21st Century Community Learning Centers program, which supports before- and after-school and summer programs for at-risk youth. Because the budget lacks many specifics, we do not yet know the full impact of the cuts.

“A significant percentage of Trump’s domestic spending cuts come from programs that are vital to low-income families,” Beckmann said. “President Trump has repeatedly said he would look out for the ‘forgotten men and women’ in our country. But with this budget, he’s the one who seems to have forgotten about them.” 

Bread for the World’s 2017 Offering of Letters: Doing Our Part to End Hunger asks Congress to pass a budget that puts us on track to end hunger by 2030.
 


AHCA Will Increase Hunger, Poverty

Bread for the World is concerned that 24 million people, including 14 million on Medicaid, would lose health insurance coverage under the House Republican’s replacement of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The replacement would increase hunger and poverty in the United States.

“The proposed American Health Care Act would have a devastating impact on poor and elderly people, driving many deeper into hunger and poverty,” said Eric Mitchell, director of government relations at Bread for the World. “Fourteen million of the poorest Americans would lose their Medicaid coverage. Oftentimes, people without health insurance must choose between putting food on the table and receiving medical care.” 

The American Health Care Act (AHCA) would cut Medicaid funding by $880 billion over 10 years, according to an analysis by the Congressional Budget Office (CBO). The AHCA would cap Medicaid funding to the states and eliminate the ACA Medicaid expansion. States would receive less money to cover children, the poor, the elderly, and the disabled, resulting in the rationing of health care. Approximately 68 million Americans receive health insurance through the Medicaid program.

The AHCA would also cut subsidies that have made it possible for millions of families to buy health insurance, dramatically raising costs for the poor and elderly. Before the ACA, 1 in 3 people with chronic medical conditions had to choose between paying for medical treatment and purchasing food for their family.


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More Resources: Activist Tool Kit

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The Activist Tool Kit is intended for new and current Bread grassroots hunger activists. It provides a set of how-to sheets for carrying out advocacy and fact sheets on the current issues Bread for the World is working on.

It's ideal as a starter toolkit for new Bread activists or as a set of updates for current activists. Form your own toolkit by printing out some or all of the sheets in the kit.

How-tos:

Issues-related pieces:

Biblical resources:


Bread Newsletter: March 2017

Contents:




About Hunger

How to End Hunger

Our Impact

Get Involved








Local resources

 



A Circle of Protection: A Statement on Why We Need to Protect


 Programs for the Poor

 

The nation faces unavoidable choices about how to balance needs and resources and allocate burdens and sacrifices. These choices are economic, political—and moral. As a community of faith, we believe the moral measure of the debate is how the most poor and vulnerable people fare.

We look at every budget proposal from the bottom up—how it treats those called “the least of these” (Matthew 25:45). They do not have powerful lobbies, but they have the most compelling claim on our consciences and common resources. The faith community has an obligation to help them be heard, to join with others to insist that programs that serve the most vulnerable in our nation and around the world are protected. We know from our experience serving hungry and homeless people that these programs meet basic human needs and protect the lives and dignity of the most vulnerable. We believe that God is calling us to pray, fast, give alms and to speak for justice.

As faith leaders, we are committed to fiscal responsibility and shared sacrifice. We are also committed to resist budget cuts that undermine the lives, dignity, and rights of poor and vulnerable people. Therefore, we join with others to form a Circle of Protection around programs that meet the essential needs of hungry and poor people at home and abroad.

1. The nation needs to substantially reduce future deficits, but not at the expense of hungry and poor people.

2. Funding focused on reducing poverty should not be cut. It should be made as effective as possible, but not cut.

3. We urge our leaders to protect and improve poverty-focused development and humanitarian assistance to promote a better, safer world.

4. National leaders must review and consider tax revenues, military spending, and entitlements in the search for ways to share sacrifice and cut deficits.

5. A fundamental task is to create jobs and spur economic growth. Decent jobs at decent wages are the best path out of poverty, and restoring growth is a powerful way to reduce deficits.

6. The budget debate has a central moral dimension. People of faith are asking how we protect “the least of these.” “How do we share sacrifice?” "How do we make 'Justice flow...'"

7. As believers, we turn to God with prayer and fasting, to ask for guidance as our nation makes decisions about our priorities as a people.

8. God continues to shower our nation and the world with blessings. As believers, we are rooted in the love of God. Our task is to share these blessings with love and justice and with a special priority for those who are poor.

Budgets are moral documents, and how we reduce future deficits are historic and defining moral choices. As faith leaders, we urge Congress and the administration to give moral priority to programs that protect the life and dignity of poor and vulnerable people in these difficult times… It is the vocation and obligation of the church to speak and act on behalf of “the least of these.” This is our calling, and we strive to be faithful in carrying out this mission.

 

"Speak up for those who cannot speak for themselves, for the rights of all who are destitute. Speak up and judge fairly; defend the rights of the poor and the needy" Proverbs 31:8-9